The use of latex products has been an ongoing issue for healthcare workers and patients due to the many allergic and sensitivity to these products

The use of latex products has been an ongoing issue for healthcare workers and patients due to the many allergic and sensitivity to these products. OSHA estimates that 8-12% of healthcare workers are latex sensitive and could experience reactions including rashes, hives, nasal and sinus symptoms, eyes symptoms, asthma, and even shock and therefore, has developed regulation for latex allergies (OSHA, n.d). According to University of Michigan Health System (n.d.), an allergic reaction to natural rubber latex is actually a reaction to a protein contained in the sap of the Brazilian rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). It is the sap that is used to manufacture latex products (UMHS, n.d.). There are two kinds of latex allergy, Type 1 is a sensitivity or allergic clinical reactivity to the protein allergens and Type IV is a sensitivity or allergic reaction to the chemical used in the manufacturing process (infectioncontroltoday.com, 2000). It is said that most people that are identified as latex allergic are sensitive or allergic to the chemicals and not essential to the protein allergens. Type I Hypersensitivity is usually due to an exposure to strange stuff like dust, pollen or latex; the response is usually immediate as it is antibody-mediated. The process called crosslinking then occur as the antigen bind to several tissues that are attached to IgE, which is on the mast cell or basophil. Similarly, in acute inflammation, histamine signal several allied allergies causing a reaction immediately, which is shown in minutes. This is due to the mast cells being pre-sensitized to the allergen. In order for this to be pre-sensitized, there should have been previously exposed as there is a formation of an antibody that is an IgE creation. Type IV Hypersensitivity is referred to as delayed hypersensitivity as it takes a few days to react, and it involves Th1 T-Cells attracting and activating Macrophages ( ). Type IV hypersensitivity is cell-mediated and delayed, rather than antibody-mediated and immediate immune response (Grossman and Porth, 2014)