The science behind daylighting design focuses on providing enough daylight for an occupied space while reducing or even completely eliminating risks of undesirable side effects

The science behind daylighting design focuses on providing enough daylight for an occupied space while reducing or even completely eliminating risks of undesirable side effects. It involves careful balancing heat gain and loss, glare control, and variations in daylight availability. Some successful daylighting designs consider the use of shading devices to reduce glare and contrast in the workspace. Additionally, window size and spacing, glass selection, reflectance of interior finishes, and position or location of interior partitions should be evaluated (Ander, 2016).

According to the U.S. Department of Energy (n.d.), Daylighting is the application of windows and skylights to bring sunlight to homes or buildings. The best way to implement daylighting in houses or buildings will depend on the climate, home design, and location. The location of windows should be based on the cardinal directions rather than the appearance of the house, for example: south-facing windows allow most winter sunlight but during summer, it admits little direct sunlight especially when proper shaded. North-facing allows relatively even natural light, making little glare and little to none unwanted summer heat gain. East and west-facing windows provide good daylight penetration but it may cause glare, allows a lot of heat during summer, and admits little solar heating during winter during morning and evening.