The report will outline the importance of promoting health to prevent the spread of the HIV disease and other sexually transmitted diseases as a whole

The report will outline the importance of promoting health to prevent the spread of the HIV disease and other sexually transmitted diseases as a whole. It has been understood that over the last decade, the number of people assessing specialist care for HIV has steadily grown. Over the decade, 2006-2015, there has been a 73% increase in the number of people assessing HIV care. Statistics show that about two thirds of people receiving HIV specialist care in 2015 were men (61,097 people) and one third were women (27, 627 people). It is critical that other public and national health organisations negotiate and introduce strategic goals as to how they’re going to address the problem so that the spread of the disease is decreased to ensure the safety of the public. This report will explore and evaluate the approaches used in HIV health promotion campaigns to promote and protect health and prevent disease. The purpose of this report is to assess the impact of these public health campaigns.
The health issue I have chosen to look into is Human Immunodeficiency Virus also known as HIV. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, if not treated. Unlike some other viruses, the human body can’t get rid of HIV completely, even with treatment. So once you get HIV, you have it for life. HIV attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells (T cells), which help the immune system fight off infections. Untreated, HIV reduces the number of CD4 cells (T cells) in the body, making the person more likely to get other infections or infection-related cancers. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and disease.