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J.B. Priestley has successfully created dramatic tension in a play named ‘An Inspector Calls’, written in 1945 with didactic purposes to question how the society deals with individuals and their own problems. The growth of tension between the characters on stage are mirrored in reader’s awareness between the rich and the poor. It is clearly to see that Priestley is able to criticize society throughout the characters on stage with his form of speech, structure and the character’s language.
Priestley uses his personal experience of politics and war to write a dramatically successful, moralistic play in 1945, at the end of the World War II. As the play written during that time, it helps Priestley to take advantage of creating tension by questioning conservative policies and categorizing classes. Tension is created between the Birlings before Inspector Goole arrived, when Sheila told Gerald “except for all last summer, when you never came near me”. As readers can see, a comma used in the quote was used to create a dramatic pause, this will keep readers engaged and also makes readers wondering what Sheila is about to reavel something from Gerald.
In act I, Eva Smith has “died in infirmary” after swallowing “strong disinfectant” and it “burnt her inside out”. The Inspector told that her death was “suicide, of course”. A comma again, is used to create another dramatic pause as the Birlings and readers are predicting that Inspertoc Goole is about to say something don’t yet know what. Eva Smith’s dead is also related to a fire and produce a mass of tension. The light in action is notified and thought deeply to create strong tension and discomfort. At first, light ‘should be pink and intimate’ to create comfort, but then it becomes ‘harder and brighter’ when the Inspector enters. Bright lights become alarming to the family and create effects as if they were placed under a microscope. In addition, vivid light shows the characters and society’s flaw as well as their own.