Hamlet

Hamlet (1609), a timeless play written by William Shakespeare, depicts man’s conscious decision to plunge into evil and tyranny can lead to massive disorder. With the use of literary and theatric devices, Shakespeare conveys this idea through the complexity of Hamlet’s thought pattern as he tries to deal with the constant surveillance and duplicitous nature of the people around him. The protagonist’s, Hamlet, despair stems from the struggle to maintain his faith in a humanist world where ‘man’ has dignity and refinement.

Hamlet tackles corruption and abuse of political power on an individual and social level “something is rotten in the state of Denmark”. It is predominantly through Hamlet’s quest for revenge that we are privy to the destructive nature of corruption. Through this endeavour he uncovers the machination of Claudius’ corrupt and manipulative nature. The imagery of disease and decay enables the audience to witness and understand the consequences thereof. In the opening scenes of the play, Shakespeare uses fragments of conversation to establish a mood of anxiety.