Drama as an interactive technique in language teaching has been used in Britain and the United State since 1970s’

Drama as an interactive technique in language teaching has been used in Britain and the United State since 1970s’ (Dodson, 2000). Richard Courtny defined drama as “the human process whereby imaginative thought becomes action, drama is based on internal empathy and identification, the leads to external impersonation”. Courtny (1980) believes that “life is drama” when people meet each other for the first time, they improvise their conversation. Jeffrey Wilhem and Brian Edmiston (1988) refer to drama as “wondering, “what if….?” and then interacting with others in a drama world as if that imagined reality was actual”. Drama is regarded as a way of life. Children like playing. They explore the world around themselves and act. Drama helps them to be prepared for life. Children use their imagination when they play. “Children bring with them to the classroom the universal human ability to play, to behave, “as if”; many children spontaneously engage in such dramatic play from as young an age as ten months” (Wagner1976). “One theoretical viewpoint about modern educational Drama emerges from the ideas of educators such as Rousseau, Montessori, Bruner, and Dewey. They say that learning happens through active participation, or as Dewey states “learning by doing (Courtney 1). Drama is a form of “learning by doing.”